Messy Kid Project: Edible Finger Paints

edible-finger-paints
So often we’re asking our children to stop making messes, clean their faces, or not play with their food. Sometimes though, it’s fun to let them explore and be kids with a colorful, edible sensory activity like edible finger paint. Here are some photos and a simple recipe to make your own…

edible finger paint

edible finger paint

We simply cleaned out some old baby jars and mixed yogurt with a bit of food coloring to make a rainbow of pastel colored paint.

Then we rolled out a huge piece of white paper on the kitchen floor and stripped Edie down to her diaper. Our favorite brand of diapers are Seventh Generation Free and Clear. I made a switch when she was about 6 months old and have never gone back to other diapers. They’re natural and free of latex, fragrances, patterns, and annoying cartoon characters. We love to strip Edie down to her diaper for messy projects, it makes clean up that much more simple.

edible finger paint

It’s so entertaining to watch and see what they do. Edie started by just spooning it around the paper but soon realized she could pour the paint from one container to another which was the most entertaining for her.

edible finger paint

edible finger paint

The mini baby jars are perfect for chubby toddler hands to hold.

edible finger paint

…Until she realized she could eat it! It’s just slightly colored vanilla yogurt so a nice mid morning snack.

edible finger paint

toddler-messy-play

Hey cute messy baby! After she tried walking off to the living room covered in yogurt goo we took a detour and headed to the sink for clean up.

toddler-messy-hands

7th-generation-hand-soap

To clean up we used Seventh Generation Hand Soap that comes in a variety of scents. We used Purely Clean but I love the Mandarin Orange scent as well. Edie knows to push the lever down and lather her hands together under the water.

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Another fun, messy project comes to a clean close!

Thanks to Seventh Generation for sponsoring this post. Photography by Liz Stanley and Ashley Aikele. Assisted by Sarah Iveson

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